Church of St. Eligius/St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Büllingen

Church of St. Eligius, Büllingen

Although I couldn’t take any photographs of the Church of St. Hubert in Amel (see: St. Lambertus Pfarrkirche, Manderfeld) (the first time, the floor was cleaned and wet and I couldn’t go inside, and the second time, it was closed), I managed to visit the Church of St. Eligius in Büllingen, in order to finish my series of churches built in the place of former Frankish palaces.

St. Hubertus Pfarrkirche, Amel

Church of St. Hubert in Amel.

Antoniushaeuschen, Amel.jpg

Antoniushäuschen – a previous 14th – or 15th-century Gothic chapel, used nowadays as a funeral parlor and a museum.

Marktkreuz, Amel

The Baroque Market cross of Amel from 1722.

Büllingen arose probably in the time of 450-600 A.C., but it was first mentioned in 789-790 as villa Bollingen.

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen (2)

The church, or more precise it’s oldest part – the tower, was first mentioned in 1130.

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen (3)

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen (5)

The church is one ‘Einstützenkirche’ (see the Church of Kronenburg) and in contrast to the church of Manderfeld, it has preserved this construction to this day, although its Neo-Gothic furnishings date from the late 19th century.

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen (4)

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen (6)

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen (9)

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen (10)

Early Roman font from the 10th century – one of the church treasures and maybe the only thing that can capture my attention here.

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen (7)

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen (8)

Various keystones on the vault.

St. Eligius Pfarrkirche, Buellingen (11)

Old tombstones in the church yard.

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