Ferschweiler Plateau, part 2

Fraubillen Cross, Ferschweiler Plateau

Hiking in nature is not my type of adventures, but if it comes to an area with so densely located monuments of different kinds as the Ferschweiler Plateau, I am ready to walk kilometers long and bear up against the muscle pain during the next couple of days with stoicism.

The first thing that I’ve came across in the Plateau was the Schankweiler Klause or the Hermitage of Schankweiler with its pilgrimage chapel from 1763.

Schankweiler Klause, Ferschweiler Plateau

Schankweiler Klause, Ferschweiler Plateau (2)

The first chapel and hermitage in the place were mentioned in 1648.

Schankweiler Klause, Ferschweiler Plateau (3)

It’s hard to take photographs through the bars, but you can see the extreme beauty of the Rococo temple.

Schankweiler Klause, Ferschweiler Plateau (4)

Schankweiler Klause, Ferschweiler Plateau (5)

Schankweiler Klause, Ferschweiler Plateau (7)

Schankweiler Klause, Ferschweiler Plateau (6)

Schankweiler Klause, Ferschweiler Plateau (8)

I see one Black Madonna here.

Schankweiler Klause, Ferschweiler Plateau (9)

The Schankweiler Klause lies apparently on the Way of Saint James. Personally, I had no clear notion of what these signs really mean and what this Way exactly is, before setting off for my Camino.

And it was strange to see how shortly before the Sunday mass, the forest gradually became alive and filled up with people. The parking lot was overfilled and there were cars all over the street leading from the main interurban street to the forest.

The second site, in contrast to the pilgrimage church, was the Fraubillen Cross.

Fraubillenkreuz, Ferschweiler Plateau.jpg

Fraubillenkreuz, Ferschweiler Plateau (2).jpg

This 3,5-metre-high cross is a 5000-year-old menhir that was, according to the legend, reshaped to a cross by Willibrord himself (see Echternach and Roth an der Our). But its pagan roots are given away by one of its names – in 1617, it was named ‘Sybil Cross’.

That was the second site here, after the monument of Diana (which I haven’t seen yet) that I wanted to visit at any cost. And I have a photo of me looking quite small next to it.

Do you see something? Neither do I. But here is the so-called Wikingerburg, or Viking Fortress, which actually has nothing to do with the Vikings. It is a 160-meter-long wall from ca. 750 – 450 BC.

Ferschweiler Plateau (3)

Ferschweiler Plateau (4)

Ferschweiler Plateau (5)

Ferschweiler Plateau (6)

Other pictures from the Ferschweiler Plateau ‘ambiente’.

Only to mention that I’ve managed to see only one small part of this mysterious and sacred area.

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